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COMPRESSION SPORTSWEAR
TRAIN HARDER. RECOVER FASTER
COMPRESSION SPORTSWEAR
TRAIN HARDER. RECOVER FASTER
COMPRESSION SPORTSWEAR
TRAIN HARDER. RECOVER FASTER
COMPRESSION SPORTSWEAR
TRAIN HARDER. RECOVER FASTER
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How you can build running into your gym routine
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How you can build running into your gym routine

Incorporating running into your gym routine can be a game-changer, offering a way to build your cardiovascular fitness, burn calories, and elevate your overall endurance.


 

Whether you're a seasoned gym-goer or just beginning your fitness journey, integrating running can amplify your results and add versatility to your workouts.

The first step to building running into your strength training with consistency – especially if running or cardio is not a natural activity for you – is to identify what you want out of it.

This could be a specific goal or something a bit more overarching, but the first 3-4 weeks will be the hardest whilst your body and mind acclimatise to a new exercise keeping that goal or objective front-of-mind will help you power through. Once you’ve identified your why, here are a few ways to incorporate running into a strength training routine…

 

WARM-UP WITH A RUN
  • Start with a 5-10 minute jog on the treadmill or outdoors at a comfortable pace.
  • Focus on gradually increasing your heart rate and warming up your muscles for the upcoming workout.
INTERVAL TRAINING
  • Perform a 5-minute warm-up jog.
  • Alternate between 1 minute of high-intensity running (80-90% effort) and 1 minute of recovery jogging or walking.
  • Repeat the intervals for a total of 10-15 minutes.
  • Finish with a 5-minute cool-down jog.
CIRCUIT TRAINING
  • Perform a dynamic warm-up including bodyweight squats, lunges, arm circles, and leg swings.
  • Set up a circuit of 5-6 exercises such as squats, push-ups, lunges, rows, planks, and burpees.
  • Perform each exercise for 30-45 seconds with minimal rest between exercises.
  • Complete 2-3 rounds of the circuit, resting 1-2 minutes between rounds.
  • Finish with a 5-minute cool-down jog or static stretching routine.
FINISH WITH A RUN
  • After completing your strength training or circuit, transition to a 10-15 minute moderate-paced run.
  • Focus on maintaining a steady pace that challenges your cardiovascular system without overexertion.
  • Use this time to clear your mind, cool down, and enjoy the benefits of post-workout cardio.
RUN AS ACTIVE RECOVERY
  • On rest days or between intense workouts, incorporate a 10-20 minute recovery run.
  • Keep the pace easy and comfortable, focusing on relaxation and promoting blood flow to aid in recovery.
  • Use this time to shake out any stiffness or soreness from previous workouts, allowing your body to recover and prepare for future training sessions.

Warm-Up with a Run

Begin your strength training session with a short run to elevate your heart rate and warm up your muscles. A 5-10 minute jog on the treadmill or around the gym can prepare your body for the upcoming workout, increasing blood flow and enhancing overall performance.

Interval Training

Incorporate running intervals between strength training sets. For example, after completing a set of squats or bench presses, perform a short burst of high-intensity running on the treadmill or outdoors. This can boost calorie burn, improve cardiovascular fitness, and add an extra challenge to your routine.

Circuit Training

Design circuit-style workouts that combine strength exercises with running intervals. Alternate between strength exercises like lunges, push-ups, and rows, with short bursts of running or sprinting. This not only builds strength and endurance but also keeps your heart rate elevated for maximum calorie burn.

Finish with a Run

Conclude your strength training session with a run to capitalise on the heightened metabolic state. After completing your final set of exercises, hit the track or treadmill for a moderate-paced run to further challenge your cardiovascular system and burn additional calories.

Run as Active Recovery

Use running as a form of active recovery between strength training sessions. On rest days or days dedicated to active recovery, engage in a light jog or low-intensity run to promote blood flow, reduce muscle soreness, and aid in recovery without overtaxing your muscles.

 


 

Integrating running into your gym routine offers a multitude of benefits for your physical and mental well-being. Whether you’re looking for the physical calorie burn or your focus is more mental – running as a training palate cleanser, for example – integrating steps like the above in manageable amounts will help you diversify how you train and ultimately create a fitter you.

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